JANNEH COMMISSION INDICTS GAMBIA’S FORMER VICE PRESIDENT ISATOU NJIE SAIDY, AND TWO OTHER JAMMEH MINISTERS!

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Three former top officials of the Jammeh dictatorship have been indicted by the Janneh Commission report for alleged abdication of duties and abuse of office, Freedom Newspaper can report. Former Vice President Isatou Njie Saidy, former Secretary General and Presidential Affairs Minister Njogu Bah, and former Tourism Minister Fatou Mass Jobe, have all been found liable and wanting by the Janneh Commission in the due execution of their duties as former public officials. The Commission, which is yet to make its report public, has established what it calls “an adverse findings” against the aforementioned former Gambian public officials. President Adama Barrow has six months to review the report before making it public.

Ms. Njie Saidy, Fatou Mass, and Njogu have been served with an adverse mention papers by the Commission. An adverse mention means when an individual, former public official, or current serving officials had been implicated in a given financial transaction; negligence of official duties; or being complicit in a financial crime.

The former public officials have been ordered by the Commission to pay up millions of dalasis or risked having their assets seized by The Gambian state. They were also advised to meet with the Attorney General Abubacarr Tambadou, or Solicitor General Cherno Marenah to see if they could reach a payment plan with the state.

Failure to comply with the Commission’s findings, could land one in legal jeopardy, sources said. Hence, that is why some of the indicted officials have since started trying to figure out how they could settle the adverse findings established against them without having the worry of facing court action.

Isatou Njie Saidy, Fatou Mass Jobe and Njogu Bah were among the long list of individuals, who were served by the Commission on the adverse findings established against the trio by the Commission.

Other former Jammeh ministers have also been indicted by the Commission. Read our subsequent publications.

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